Meteor M N2-2 Successfully Launched: Awaiting LRPT Signal

meteorm launched

On July 5 the Russian Meteor M N2-2 weather satellite was successfully launched into orbit and appears to be healthy. The LRPT weather camera signal is not yet broadcasting however, and we expect it to still take roughly 1-2 months before it begins (if all goes well) as satellites typically run through a long list of qualification tests before becoming operational. During this time there may be broadcasts of test patterns that can be caught. Meteor M N2-2 can currently be tracked in Orbitron and online at N2YO.

To try and dispel any confusion over the naming scheme, “Meteor M N2” is the currently operational LRPT satellite. “Meteor M N2-1” unfortunately failed in 2017 as it did not separate from the rocket. “Meteor M N2-2” is the new satellite which has just been successfully launched. Meteor M N2 and M N2-2 is often abbreviated as just “Meteor M2” and “Meteor M2-2”. In the past there was Meteor M N1, but this satellite is no longer operational. We have upcoming launches for Meteor M2-3, M2-4, MP-1 and M3 to look forward to which are scheduled for 2020 and 2021.

Back on June 28 we posted about how Meteor M2 was experiencing orientation issues for a few days. Those issues appear to have been rectified now. Hopefully if M2 remains stable we’ll have two Meteor LRPT weather satellites to receive alongside the three NOAA APT satellites.

If you’re interested, there were also several other payloads onboard the rocket carrying M2-2, including a low cost Czech experimental cubesat called Lucky7 whose telemetry can be received in the amateur radio band at 437.525 MHz. There is an onboard camera too, but no details on how to receive it yet.

Soyuz Rocket carrying Meteor M2-2 Launched successfully. [Source: spaceflightnow]